The Economist Radio (All audio)

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Sinopsis

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio

Episodios

  • Babbage: Collusions and collisions

    Babbage: Collusions and collisions

    24/02/2021 Duración: 26min

    After Facebook reached a deal with Australia, the tech giants are coming under fire once again -- this time from each other. Are their cosy monopolies under threat? Also, The Economist’s defence editor investigates the multi-billion dollar industry which exploits vulnerabilities in vital software. And, how whales could help the study of seismology in the ocean. Kenneth Cukier hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Let the games be thin: Tokyo’s Olympic tussles

    Let the games be thin: Tokyo’s Olympic tussles

    24/02/2021 Duración: 21min

    Planners are in a corner. Delaying or cancelling the summer tournament looks like defeat; pressing ahead looks like a danger. We take a look at the sporting chances. Britain has decarbonised faster than any other rich country, but getting to “net zero” will be a whole lot harder. And why South Koreans have such trouble with noisy neighbours.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money Talks: Pricing pollution

    Money Talks: Pricing pollution

    23/02/2021 Duración: 26min

    Could the success of the world’s biggest carbon market provide a model for the world? Plus, Cristina Junqueira, cofounder of Nubank, a Brazilian digital bank, on how the pandemic is supercharging the fintech revolution. And, why sports cards’ leap from the schoolyard to the stock exchange reveals the growing financial power of social networks. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Confirmation biases: Biden’s cabinet picks

    Confirmation biases: Biden’s cabinet picks

    23/02/2021 Duración: 20min

    President Joe Biden’s top posts are shaping up as Senate confirmation hearings continue—but some controversial nominations await a vote. We look at who is on the docket. Politics in the Democratic Republic of Congo has become messy, at the expense of some promised and much-needed reforms. And why the global rap scene is picking up a London accent. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Jab: Are the vaccines effective enough?

    The Jab: Are the vaccines effective enough?

    22/02/2021 Duración: 36min

    Three vaccines have been approved by stringent regulators. Ten are being used in one or more countries. How do they work and are they effective enough against new variants of the coronavirus?Sarah Gilbert, inventor of the Oxford/Astrazeneca vaccine, tells us adapting to new variants should be easy. The Economist’s Beijing bureau chief David Rennie reports from China, which faces a huge test of its homegrown vaccine technology as it tries to re-open. James Fransham from our data team on how far the variants have spread.Alok Jha, The Economist's science correspondent, hosts with our health policy editor, Natasha Loder. Slavea Chankova, The Economist's health-care correspondent, joins them.For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/thejabpod and sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The World Ahead: When cities breathe out

    The World Ahead: When cities breathe out

    22/02/2021 Duración: 20min

    Covid-19 has dented the prosperity, populations and popularity of big cities around the world. But adapting to shocks is what great cities do. How will urban centres change in the post-pandemic world and what are the political implications of a shift towards more remote working from suburban areas? Tom Standage hosts. Subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Contrary to popular opinion: Mexico’s president

    Contrary to popular opinion: Mexico’s president

    22/02/2021 Duración: 19min

    Andrés Manuel López Obrador roared into office with a grand “fourth transformation” agenda. Even after two years of policy failures and power-grabbing, he remains wildly popular. An eye-catching new report implores economists to take biodiversity into account—and puts some sobering limits on growth. And a chat through the state of the art in conversational computers.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s Picks: February 22nd 2021

    Editor’s Picks: February 22nd 2021

    22/02/2021 Duración: 19min

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, America’s ambitious attempt to deal with climate change, why SPACs are a useful way to take firms public (08:52) and how data on inbred nobles support a leader-driven theory of history (15:16)  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Checks and Balance: The switch

    Checks and Balance: The switch

    19/02/2021 Duración: 45min

    Plans to overhaul American energy will soon come before Congress. There will never be a better chance for Joe Biden to show real ambition on climate. If the blackouts in Texas are any guide, it would not just be the world that thanks him, but Americans, too. But the politics of greening America are never easy. What might the new president get done?We hear from John Kerry, Mr Biden’s climate envoy, Varshini Prakash of Sunrise, a movement of young climate activists who helped get the new president elected, and from West Virginia Senator Joe Manchin, whose vote will be crucial in passing new laws.John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/USpod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Have I not news for you: Facebook’s Australian battle

    Have I not news for you: Facebook’s Australian battle

    19/02/2021 Duración: 21min

    A media code that would obligate tech giants to pay for linking to news stories looks set to pass. In response, Facebook pre-emptively took down those links—and a whole lot more. So-called honour killings persist in the Arab world; we examine the support for such murders and look at attempts to reform lax laws. And remembering the jazz-fusion giant Chick Corea.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Economist Asks: Herbert Diess

    The Economist Asks: Herbert Diess

    18/02/2021 Duración: 28min

    When will the electric car rule the road? Herbert Diess, the chief executive of Germany's Volkswagen Group, talks to Anne McElvoy and Simon Wright, The Economist’s Industry editor, about its plans to switch from the internal-combustion engine to electrification. More than a dozen countries have set a date for when they will prohibit sales of fossil-fuelled cars -- but are these plans realistic? He also tells us why his daughter doesn’t own a car and who he thinks will win the electrification race.Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Watts the problem: Texas’s energy failings

    Watts the problem: Texas’s energy failings

    18/02/2021 Duración: 23min

    Crippling blackouts can be explained in part by the state’s unique energy market, but the disaster exposes wider failures that must be confronted amid a changing climate. Today’s landing of another Mars rover broadens the hunt for evidence of extraterrestrial life—an effort that is expanding faster and farther than ever before. And soft rock shakes off its milquetoast manner.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceofferListen and subscribe to “The Jab from Economist Radio”, our new weekly podcast at the sharp end of the global vaccination race.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Babbage: Hard reboot

    Babbage: Hard reboot

    17/02/2021 Duración: 25min

    Intel is the world’s biggest chipmaker. So why is it underperforming—and can its new boss turn the company around? As the search for life on Mars hots up, astrophysicist Avi Loeb argues science has already detected evidence of intelligent extraterrestrial life. And, why parents of daughters are more likely to divorce than those with sons. Kenneth Cukier hosts Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The next of 1,000 cuts: Hong Kong activists on trial

    The next of 1,000 cuts: Hong Kong activists on trial

    17/02/2021 Duración: 20min

    It is not violent young protesters in the dock: the accused are the architects of the territory’s democracy. Our correspondent examines the city’s descent into authoritarian rule. In Colombia, activists are disappearing or being killed at a horrific rate. We ask why, and what can be done. And weighing up Oregon’s daring drug-decriminalisation experiment.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Money Talks: Return of the wheelie-bag

    Money Talks: Return of the wheelie-bag

    16/02/2021 Duración: 23min

    Globetrotting had never been easier—then the pandemic brought it to a standstill. The Economist’s industry editor Simon Wright investigates how mass travel has changed the world and what it will take to get people moving again. Could this shock to the system be an opportunity to make the future of tourism greener, safer and more enjoyable?With Michael O’Leary, CEO of Ryanair, James Liang, chairman of CTrip and Trip.com, Gloria Guevara, president of the World Travel and Tourism Council, and Brian Pearce, chief economist of the International Air Transport Association.Subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Desert stands: France in the Sahel

    Desert stands: France in the Sahel

    16/02/2021 Duración: 22min

    Terror groups and separatists run riot in the sprawling region, and France has had some success in keeping the peace. But how, and when, to draw down its troops? Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, the World Trade Organisation’s history-making new leader, has quite the task ahead to rebuild trust in and among the institution’s members. And the worrying shifts in subsea soundscapes. Additional audio courtesy Jana Winderen. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Jab: How well will vaccines work?

    The Jab: How well will vaccines work?

    15/02/2021 Duración: 40min

    The race between infections and injections is in its most crucial phase. What life is like on the other side of the pandemic depends on three things: how well vaccines work, whether there are enough and how many people take them.Michael Osterholm, an epidemiologist who has advised President Biden, tells us the world stands at an inflection point. After getting his jab in Jerusalem, our correspondent there says the vision of the future Israel offers other countries is not as rosy as it first seemed. James Fransham from The Economist data team unpicks the vaccination numbers so far. Alok Jha, The Economist's science correspondent, hosts with our health policy editor, Natasha Loder. Edward Carr, The Economist's deputy editor, joins them.For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe here: economist.com/thejabpodSubscribe to our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience and data newsletter at www.economist.com/offthecharts  See acast.com/privacy fo

  • No Capitol punishment: Trump’s acquittal

    No Capitol punishment: Trump’s acquittal

    15/02/2021 Duración: 24min

    Donald Trump was all but certain to be cleared in his Senate trial, and so it went. But the few Republican votes to convict are telling. What next for the former president? A look into Swiss efforts to track down a missing $230m raises disturbing questions. And why women aren’t getting the laughs as stand-up comedy grows in China.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceofferListen and subscribe to “The Jab from Economist Radio”, our new weekly podcast at the sharp end of the global vaccination race.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Editor’s Picks: February 15th 2021

    Editor’s Picks: February 15th 2021

    15/02/2021 Duración: 24min

    A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: how to cope with endemic covid-19, the persecution of the Uyghurs (11:40) and the perks and perils of business leaders (16:50) Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:www.economist.com/podcastoffer  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Checks and Balance: Lacking class

    Checks and Balance: Lacking class

    12/02/2021 Duración: 39min

    Nearly half America’s children are yet to return to the classroom a year after the pandemic began. President Biden says it’s a national emergency, but he has already diluted a pledge to reopen the majority of schools in his first 100 days. Why is getting back to school so hard?We hear from The Economist’s US policy correspondent Tamara Gilkes Borr and Adam Roberts, our Midwest correspondent.John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/USpod  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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